Mar/Apr
1993

The hyperlearning revolution will replace public education!

School’s Out

by Lewis J. Perelman

Because classroom teaching is obsolete in the hyperlearning era, choice offered in the form of "vouchers" to pay tuition for schools are as irrelevant to hyperlearning as choices of horses are to modern transportation.

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May/Jun
1993

Jul/Aug
1993

Sep/Oct
1993

Nothing left but porn, music piracy and bomb building plans

Life On the Net, 2015

by Bruce Sterling Portrait Bruce Sterling
  • 80 percent graphic image files of attractive young women without veils or, in fact, much clothing of any kind.
  • 15 percent digitally stored pirated copies of Western pop music and Western videos, still illegal to possess in Tehran.
  • And, 5 percent text files in the Farsi language describing how to build, deliver, and park truck-bombs in major urban areas.

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Nov
1993

Copyrights are stripped off on the way into the Net!

Is Copyright Dead on the Net?

by Lance Rose

What can "copyright" possibly mean when millions of people can download the information they find on the Internet? So far, the idea of open access to these materials hasn't slowed down the onslaught of new information flowing into the Net. Will any of the approaches to copyright prevail? Probably not. More likely, all of these approaches will find their own niches in the vast, amorphous community that is the Net.

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Dec
1993

Down with GUIs!!!

by Jef Raskin

Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) are not human-compatible.
As long as we hang on to interfaces as we now know them, computers will remain inherently frustrating, upsetting, and stressful.

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Jan
1994

Feb
1994

The advertising game is over!

Is Advertising Dead?

by Michael Schrage Cover Magazine 2.02

Some say the mass marketing game is changing. They're wrong. That game is over and the rules for an entirely new game are only just now being written. But one thing is certain: In the one-to-one future, the consumer will be the one in the driver's seat, and the advertiser will be thumbing a ride.

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Mar
1994

There will be no 500-channel future!
There will be no virtual sex!
There will be no infobahn!

Backlash: The Infobahn is a Big, Fat Joke

by Mark Stahlman

All the headlines about the digital, interactive, 500-channel, multi-megamedia blow-your-socks-off future are pure hype. There will be no 500-channel future. There will be no US$3 trillion mother of all industries. There will be no virtual sex. There will be no infobahn. None of it - at least not the way you've been reading about it.

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Apr
1994

The End of Privacy

by Brock Meeks

If privacy isn't already the first roadkill along the information superhighway, then it's about to be. That's the impression left by a law enforcement panel that addressed the administration's Information Infrastructure Task Force Working Group on Privacy earlier this year.

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May
1994

Jun
1994

Jul
1994

Aug
1994

Sep
1994

Online or Not, Newspapers Suck

by Jon Katz

How can any industry which regularly pulls Doonesbury strips for being too controversial possibly hope to survive online?

The newspaper industry has never liked change, viewing it rather the way a Temperance Lady viewed speakeasies. For a long time, papers have demonstrated an unerring instinct for making the wrong move at the wrong time. At heart, newspapers are reluctant to change because of their ingrained belief that they are the superior, serious, worthwhile medium, while things electronic are trivial or faddish. That makes newspapers the biggest and saddest losers in the information revolution. With the possible exception of network-TV newscasts, papers are now our least hip medium, relentlessly one-way, non-interactive, and smug.

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Oct
1994

Prodigy, AOL, and CompuServe are so obsolete!

The (Second Phase of the) Revolution Has Begun

by Gary Wolfe

Mosaic is well on its way to becoming the world's standard interface. Mosaic is the celebrated graphical "browser" that allows users to travel through the world of electronic information using a point-and-click interface. Mosaic's charming appearance encourages users to load their own documents onto the Net, including color photos, sound bites, video clips, and hypertext "links" to other documents. By following the links - click, and the linked document appears - you can travel through the online world along paths of whim and intuition. Mosaic is not the most direct way to find online information. Nor is it the most powerful. It is merely the most pleasurable way.

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Nov
1994

Dec
1994

The killer application isn't video-on-demand!

E-Money (That's What I Want)

by Steven Levy

It's going to hit you where it really matters - in your wallet. It's, not only going to revolutionize the Net, it will change the global economy. Hard currency has been a useful item for a few millennia or so, but now it has simply worn out its welcome.

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Jan
1995

Feb
1995

Mar
1995

Apr
1995

May
1995

Forget 900 numbers.

The Next Best Thing To Being There

by Robert Rossney

Virtual Connections has come up with the latest in adult entertainment: personalized video sex.

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Jun
1995

Jul
1995

Aug
1995

You never have to buy a CD again!

Music on Demand

by Charles Platt

The father of Unix, has invented a new technology that could mean never having to buy a CD again.
Imagine something slightly more convenient: a music database on a computer, cross-indexed by artist, date, and song title. Imagine that when you click on a song, you hear it immediately, straight from your hard drive to your stereo.

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Sep
1995

Oct
1995

Computers won't leave humans behind

Fear no AI

by Giles Bowkett

Computers are stuck in an intimate symbiosis with human beings because we're the dominant factor in their reproduction. Humans and computers will grow together, becoming increasingly difficult to separate. Instead of replacing us, computers will become a secondary, symbiotic species, enhancing our lives in specialized but powerful ways. In the process, they will transform what it means to be human.

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Nov
1995

The net is NO public sphere!

The Net as a public sphere?

by Mark Poster

We must remember that the Net is something entirely new, and its effects on democratic politics can't be predicted using historical precedent. Virtual communities are being promoted as nascent public spheres that will renew democracy in the 21st century. True, the Net allows people to talk as equals. But rational argument rarely prevails, and achieving consensus is seen as impossible.

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Dec
1995

Jan
1996

Good-Bye reading. Long live referencing!

The Balm of Reading

by David Weinberger

The digital and hypertextual forces supposedly leading to the death of reading are in fact going to lead to its golden age. Pretty soon we won't call using online reference works reading. Instead, we'll just call it referencing. This will leave the term reading to describe engaging printed matter where sequence does count, where the order of the presentation is an important part of its value - novels, essays, poems. Reading will become a time of continuity in a fragmented world.

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Feb
1996

Mar
1996

Apr
1996

The days of plain text are numbered.

In Praise of ASCII

by David Shenk

It won't be much longer before email and other textual environments follow the lead of the Web with support for italics, underlining, bold, and other tonal options.

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May
1996

Jun
1996

Death to Newsgroups

by Andrew C. Bulhak

Usenet is in trouble. Newcomers must choose an appropriate newsgroup - if one exists - from some 8,000. In addition, the system is easily abused; an unscrupulous advertiser can flood thousands of newsgroups, wasting bandwidth and disk space. The solution? Get rid of newsgroups.

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Jul
1996

Aug
1996

Sep
1996

Good-bye text, welcome speech!

The Interface is the Message

by Bernard J. Hibbitts

Today, sophisticated forms of human-computer interaction are replacing text with speech. The WWW is offering a multimedia experience that's both seen and heard. In these circumstances, people can use computer technology to reclaim, extend, and emancipate their voices. This suggests that the interface - not the medium - is the message.

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Oct
1996

Everything we use will be bound to the net.

The Embedded Internet

by David Kline

The products are hitting the market now. They will not only greatly expand the Net's role as a mass consumer medium, but will also change it into a powerful industrial force that will reshape the dynamics of the market and the competitive strategies of businesses by the end of this decade.

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Nov
1996

New innovations can't be anti-Web or anti-HTML.

Tuning in to Marimba

by Jesse Freud

The real challenge is to take HTML to the next level, not to throw out HTML for Java.

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Dec
1996

Jan
1997

Feb
1997

Mar
1997

KISS YOUR BROWSER GOODBYE!!!

PUSH!

by Kevin Kelly and Gary Wolf

The radical future of media beyond the Web: The Web browser is about to croak. In its place broader and deeper new interfaces for electronic media are being born. We think we "surf" the Web now, but what we really do is hopscotch across fragile stepping-stones of texts, or worse, spelunk in a vast unmapped cave of documents. Only when waves of media begin to cascade behind our screens - huge swells of unbrowsable stuff - will we truly surf. Push media arrive automatically - on your desktop, in your email, via your pager.

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Apr
1997

Spectrum is the real estate on which the wealth of the 21st century will be built!

Get Wireless

by Catharine Lo

Air. You need to know about air. Not for breathing, but for something almost as elemental - for communicating. The airwaves, the electromagnetic spectrum - this truly is the next frontier of the Digital Revolution. Within the next decade, that air grab will be over. The new wireless infrastructure - the complement to our wired infrastructure - will be well on its way to completion. Vast networks of antennas will be constructed on the ground. Even more vast networks of space satellites will arch overhead. If all goes well, you'll be enveloped in cheap, high-bandwidth, ubiquitous connectivity. Everywhere on the planet.

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May
1997

Bye-Bye paper. Welcome ink!

Digital Ink

by Charles Platt

Printed Paper Is Cheap, Cheerful, And Ubiquitous. It's The Bedrock Of A Billion-Dollar Global Industry. And If MIT's Joe Jacobson Can Work Out A Few Little Details, It's Over. Suppose there's a way to replace ink as we know it. An invention that revolutionizes publishing and threatens the global paper industry. Something so basic yet so flexible, it changes everything from books and newspapers to wallpaper and package design.

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Jun
1997

Jul
1997

We're facing 25 years of prosperity, freedom, and a better environment for the whole world.

The Long Boom: A History of the Future, 1980 - 2020

by Peter Schwartz and Peter Leyden Cover of Magazine 5.07

So suspend your disbelief. Open up to the possibilities. Try to think like one of those future historians, marveling at the changes that took place in the 40-year period that straddled the new millennium. Sit back and read through the future history of the world.

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Aug
1997

Sep
1997

Oct
1997

The webs next level is: War with TV

Real Revolution

by Robert H. Reid

The stakes RealVideo raises are huge, not just for Progressive but for the Internet as a whole and maybe for the entire exploding universe that used to be called the broadcast industry. In a home-run scenario, RealVideo could transform the Net into a mass-market conduit for all manner of video content - one that could some day challenge the landed interests of the TV industry and transform Progressive into a kingmaking Internet powerhouse.

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Nov
1997

Dec
1997

The NEW currency: attention...forget about money!

Attention Shoppers!

by Michael H. Goldhaber

Yet, ours is not truly an information economy. By definition, economics is the study of how a society uses its scarce resources. And information is not scarce - especially on the Net, where it is not only abundant, but overflowing. We are drowning in information, yet constantly increasing our generation of it. So a key question arises: Is there something else that flows through cyberspace, something that is scarce and desirable? There is. No one would put anything on the Internet without the hope of obtaining some. It's called attention. And the economy of attention - not information - is the natural economy of cyberspace.

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Jan
1998

Bye-bye

by Randall Rothenberg

The Net's precision accountability will kill not only traditional advertising, but its parasite, Big Media. Sniff. The spurious distinction between image advertising and retail advertising will erode, then disappear, as each advertisement, every product placement, all editorial can be tied to transactions.

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Feb
1998

Mar
1998

Apr
1998

Forget the browser!

The Televisionspace Race

by Frank Rose Cover Magazine 6.04

Microsoft wants to be in the box. (And if he has his way, television and Windows will be as inseparable as television and football are now.) During his performance at January's Consumer Electronics Show Bill Gates announced his landmark deal with Tele-Communications Inc. - an agreement that will put Windows CE, the lite operating system, on 5 million digital set-top boxes which the cable giant plans to deploy sometime in 1999.

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May
1998

Personalized messages aren't personal!

The Promise of One to One (A Love Story)

by Chip Bayers Cover Magazine 6.05

It's all about using the trick of technology to deliver a personalized message that isn't really personal at all. Sites considering mass customization will ask whether it can help squeeze a little bit extra out of every customer. Technology is going to empower the producer far more than it empowers the consumer. Promises, promises.

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Jun
1998

Jul
1998

Aug
1998

Forget Asimov's laws, forget R2-D2, forget AI altogether. These technocidal machines were born to kill.

Die, Robot

by Charles Platt

Some robots are primitive metal boxes improvised by high school students in basement workshops; others are as sleek as race cars, crafted by professional model makers at Hollywood f/x houses. Mark Setrakian, for instance, developed some of the creatures for Men in Black; at the 1997 Robot Wars he exhibited a huge steel snake, 13 feet long, that writhed and crashed across the arena, rousing a standing ovation from the capacity crowd.

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Sep
1998

Bye-bye abbreviations, dots, and slashes!

Keyword: Obsolete

by Jonathan Zittrain

Point your browser to www.ual.com/ and your request is routed through domain name servers that locate the numerical IP address of the computer hosting the United Airlines Web site. Soon, however, you won't have to key some arcane combination of abbreviations, dots, and slashes. Instead, you will type in "United Airlines" and be whisked directly to the site. This convenience will come thanks to Internet Keywords, which Netscape plans to integrate into the Navigator 4.5 browser. By diverting words or phrases in the browser location bar to Netscape's Netcenter for translation, Netcenter will decide which destination most closely matches the word or phrase, then route the browser accordingly.

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Oct
1998

Nov
1998

Dec
1998

Bill Gates's Reign Is Over!

83 Reasons Why Bill Gates's Reign Is Over

by unknown Cover of Magazine 6.12

Look at Microsoft today. It's beset by distributed-computing technology like Sun Microsystems' Java and Jini. It's threatened by the Internet, which is beyond domination by a single technology or set of tools. On dozens of fronts ranging from bandwidth to set-top boxes to handheld devices to embedded systems, innovation is accelerating. No company can be boss of all the new stuff.

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Jan
1999

Feb
1999

The web is the mall to end all malls!

It's 1995 All Over Again!

by Brad Wieners

FreeShop CEO Tim Choate, W3 Networks president Steve Bonneau, and Steve Tomlin, head of AOL's PersonaLogic, each believe their comparative shopping services will set the new standard. "Most people," Tomlin says, "want more than simply the lowest price. They want to know vendor reliability, delivery speed, value-added services."

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Mar
1999

EVERYTHING will be ordered electronically!

The Inner Bezos

by Chip Bayers

If Jeff Bezos's vision comes true, here's how you'll shop in 2020:
The vast bulk of store-bought goods - food staples, paper products, cleaning supplies, and the like - you will order electronically. Some physical storefronts will survive, but they'll have to offer at least one of two things: entertainment value or immediate convenience.

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Apr
1999

May
1999

Jun
1999

IN SOME PERIOD OF TIME MOST PEOPLE WILL MAKE THEIR LIVING WITH BITS, NOT ATOMS!

Being Rural

by Nicholas Negroponte

When this happens, the balance of wealth and job opportunity will change in favor of a bucolic lifestyle. The flow of people will be out of, not into, cities. In fact, we may all have to relearn country living.

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Jul
1999

What's really driving the wireless future? The cell phone!!!

Air Apparent

by Charles Platt

While telematics promises to turn the car into a rolling content platform, that's only one direction the future of mobile computing will take. In fact, the cell phone is driving the data stream, making information more portable in every sense of the word. Soon you'll be able to see - not just hear - the 411 on everything from driving directions to shopping lists. In other words, your desktop PC soon won't need a modem or phone line anymore. Via serial cable or radio link, it will talk to your smart phone, which will maintain faster Web access than your local telco can provide, and at lower cost.

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Aug
1999

The hottest portable devices ever!

The MP3 Players

by Jesse Freund Cover Magazine 7.08

Consumer-friendly MP3 players herald a new age in music. Simply put, the promise that all music will one day be in a universal digital format, distributed over a network to stand-alone audio players, has proved irresistible.

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Sep
1999

The market will fluctuate daily, but by 2010, the Dow will soar past the 50,000 mark.

The Roaring Zeros

by Kevin Kelly

Yet ultraprosperity for Americans looks more plausible all the time. The metrics point to it: a booming stock market, low inflation, high employment, steady consumer confidence, price stability, low interest rates, rising wages, lowering crime, and no sign of any of these waning. While the End of Civilization As We Know It can happen anytime (you know the script), the Beginning of Prosperity As We Have Never Known It seems equally probable.

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Oct
1999

Nov
1999

The Almighty isn't dead, he's an energy field.

This Is Your Brain on God

by Jack Hitt

I'm taking part in a vanguard experiment on the physical sources of spiritual consciousness, the current work-in-progress of Michael Persinger, a neuropsychologist at Canada's Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. His theory is that the sensation described as "having a religious experience" is merely a side effect of our bicameral brain's feverish activities.

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Dec
1999

Forget Y2K. IPv6 is here!

Breaking Protocol

by Nick Montford

The Net's first major upgrade ever: IPv6 eliminates extensions and gives every user their own direct line. However, this also potentially eliminates online anonymity by including in the address space the manufacturer of your PC's network card and your 48-bit Ethernet address.

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Jan
2000

There is a huge future in biological body manipulations!

Don't Die, Stay Pretty.

Introducing the ultrahuman makeover.

by Brian Alexander

The Extropy Institute's founder, a chiseled, ponytailed philosophy PhD named Max More, confidently declared, "This is the fourth revolution in our history - the ultrahuman revolution." Scientists have long regarded the human life span as relatively fixed. Currently, the maximum is 122 years, the age at which Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, the longest-lived human for whom reliable records exist, died in 1997. In the 20th century, doctors and researchers have focused mainly on expanding the average life expectancy, succeeding dramatically in the developed world - adding 30 years in the United States, for instance. Today, as a result of antibiotics, vaccines, public sanitation, and preventive medicine, so many centenarians are puttering around that Willard Scott would have to say happy birthday to about 200 a day just to keep up.

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Feb
2000

Mar
2000

The evolution of capitalism is completed!

Capitalist Econstruction

by Chip Bayers Cover Magazine 8.03

Think beyond ecommerce: A new school of researchers envisions an economic revolution that will usher in a 24/7 global marketplace of true fluid markets, real dynamic pricing, and kick-ass shopbots. For hundreds of years, the smartest economists, businesspeople, and scholars have studied the evolution of capitalism the way they'd consider the slow blooming of a flower through a series of time-lapse photographs. Today's scholars - thanks to the pure, dumb luck of being alive in today's economy - get to watch the flower unfold before them. Even better: So do we.

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Apr
2000

Good-Bye humans. Welcome 21st-century technologies!

Why the future doesn't need us.

by Bill Joy Cover Magazine 8.04

Our most powerful 21st-century technologies - robotics, genetic engineering, and nanotech - are threatening to make humans an endangered species. It was only in the autumn of 1998 that I became anxiously aware of how great are the dangers facing us in the 21st century. We are being propelled into this new century with no plan, no control, no brakes. Have we already gone too far down the path to alter course? I don't believe so, but we aren't trying yet, and the last chance to assert control - the fail-safe point - is rapidly approaching.

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Mai
2000

Jun
2000

Data is useless! Let's make information out of it!

Greetings from Info Mesa

by Ed Regis

Forget coyote art and adobe. Santa Fe's next claim to fame will be rescuing us from the digital data avalanche. Data is useless, however, until it's organized, analyzed, categorized, and understood - that is, until it's converted into information. But humans have long since proven unequal to the task of interpreting these infinite data streams. Hence the need for some grand new tools.

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Jul
2000

The Death of Silicon

Molecular Electronics Will Change Everything

by Rick Overton

It's the dawn of a new technological revolution: The Next Big Thing is very, very small. Picture trillions of transistors, processors so fast their speed is measured in terahertz, infinite capacity, zero cost. Can you say Thiophene Ethynylene Valley? Silicon technology will reach fundamental limits by 2017. The party driven by Moore's law will be over.

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Aug
2000

Sep
2000

Forget about controlling technology's impact on sports!

Ready, Set, Mutate

by Andrew Tilin Cover Magazine 8.09

It's the 21st century - let the augmentations begin: Athletes have reached certain physical limitations and now technology is optimizing their performance. Within at least five years, elite athletes will be able to obtain genetic upgrades, injecting mutated nucleotide chains that stimulate the production of oxygen-toting red blood cells or increased musculature.

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Oct
2000

The faceless interface is dead. Long live skins...

GIUs Just Want to Have Fun

by Dan Koeppel personalized Skin of Winamp

...the hyper-personal edge of desktop computing. The need to personalize one's surroundings seems fundamental to human existence. In about 5 or 10 years skinning will be an everymagazineNumber part of using computers. Skinning is the "third P" of Internet marketing. It isn't push, and it isn't pull. It's presence.

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Nov
2000

The end of e-dultery...

Caught in the Act

by Jeffrey M. O'Brien

Does your spouse or significant other mysteriously turn off the computer whenever you enter the room? Do you suspect you're living with a cybercheater who's trolling chat rooms to engage in illicit romance? Enter Elizabeth Field, the 25-year-old founder of Infidelity Busters, a decoy-for-hire service which, for 100 bucks, will smoke out your no-good cheater of a partner.

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Dec
2000

Jan
2001

Today the crypto wars are largely over

Lost in the Scramble

by Simson Garfinkel

The revolution in cryptography, the one that created ecommerce as we know it, was never supposed to happen. The science of encryption had always belonged to the US military - and for the security of the country, it was going to stay that way. Today the crypto wars are largely over: The NSA lost, the hackers won, and unbreakable cryptography is now available worldwide. Whether that does more to increase privacy or jeopardize democracy is anybody's guess.

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Feb
2001

Human cloning has always been frightening, seductive - and completely out of reach. Not anymore.

(You)2

by Brian Alexander Cover of Magazine 9.02

The tribal consciousness of animal cloners thinks human cloning has already been done, but quietly. This way, there is no government or social wrath, no reputations ruined, no patents publicly infringed. But the underground - and the rest of us, too - is still fascinated by the rumor mill. Something is happening. Or about to happen. Or has happened. Nobody is quite sure. The mill grinds.

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Mar
2001

Forget E=mc2. Planet Earth is growing - fast.

Master of the Universe

by Jeffrey M. O'Brien

At the bench press, with 360 pounds resting 2 feet over his head, Neal Adams is holding forth about a radical scientific theory he dreamed up, one he believes is supported by an undersea map published in 1996 by the National Geophysical Data Center, a division of the US Department of Commerce. The map illustrates that nowhere on Earth is the seafloor older than 180 million years. This has Adams very excited. If Earth is more than 4 billion years old, as most experts believe, how could the ocean floor be so young? The answer, Adams says, is simple: The map is proof - proof! - that Earth is growing, steadily increasing in mass and volume. The planet isn't just getting older; it's getting bigger.

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Apr
2001

The hot new Medium: Paper

by Steve Silbermann Cover Magazine 9.04

How the oldest interface in the book is redrawing the map of the networked world: The most advanced digital input screen ever developed has very high resolution, perfect contrast, and costs a fraction of a cent to produce. Any graphical interface can be printed on it, and you get years of full-time education, paid for by the government, to learn how to use it. It will not be beaten in our lifetime. Building a network that can transform millions of sheets of paper into a new front end for the Internet.

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May
2001

The Future Will Be Fast But Not Free

by Charles Platt Cover Magazine 9.05

You want broadband. You'll get it. You'll pay for it. You'll like it. Ten years from now, when every PalmPilot can display video, a webcam is built into every monitor, and full-screen clips are commonly sent as email attachments, the broadband metamorphosis will be complete. At that time, the egalitarian Net will be a distant memory - but no one will care. Users won't reminisce about the equalizing effect of 28.8 modems any more than car drivers yearn for a time when everyone had to drive equally slowly, because dirt roads hadn't been paved with asphalt. The Net is dead. Long live the Net.

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Jun
2001

Jul
2001

Aug
2001

Sep
2001

Oct
2001

Say good-bye to the Blue Screen of Death...

A Cure for the Blues

by Doc Searls

The most productivity-enhancing feature of Microsoft's Windows XP, set for release in October, won't be mentioned in the ad campaign. But somewhere between adding product activation and Passport authentication to the new OS, Microsoft programmers finally installed a fix for the most dreaded bug of all: the Blue Screen of Death. Microsoft has long denied claims of frequent BSOD appearances, even after the glitch surprised Bill Gates during a big-screen demo of Windows 98 at Comdex/Spring that year.

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Nov
2001

Forget the World Wide Web on your cell phone!

Be here now

by David S. Bennahum

The key to the always-on, everywhere wireless Internet comes down to three things: location, location, location. It turns out that having the Web in your pocket is not all that useful. The Internet-on-your-cell phone ends up being a slow and clumsy imitation of what we have on our desktops - with one key advantage: It's available anywhere. The ability to pinpoint location will likely generate the sort of demand for wireless services we haven't yet seen.

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Dec
2001

Data will flow in ways it never has before

The Surveillance Society

by Adam L. Penenberg Cover Magazine 9.12

Cell phones that pinpoint your location. Cameras that track your every move. Subway cards that remember. We routinely sacrifice privacy for convenience and security. So stop worrying. And get ready for your close-up. The legal protections that might have prevented access to this data are eroding.

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Jan
2002

Feb
2002

The Post Office No Longer Delivers

Return to Sender

by Adam L. Penenberg

Overhaul the system - or abolish it. There's one foolproof method for improving mail delivery: Abolish the system. It's not too difficult to imagine life without it. There's FedEx, automatic withdrawals, email, and Internet bill payment (one of the few worthwhile legacies of the dotcom era for consumers). It's useful to ask what, exactly, Americans get out of the USPS, and how we might retain what we like while reducing the risks.

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Mar
2002

Apr
2002

May
2002

Blogging foments a revolution...

The Blogging Revolution

by Andrew Sullivan Illustration Blogging

...in how journalism functions in our culture. Weblogs Are To Words What Napster Was To Music. Poised between media, blogs can be as nuanced and well-sourced as traditional journalism, but they have the immediacy of talk radio. Amid it all, this much is clear: The phenomenon is real: a publishing revolution more profound than anything since the printing press.

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Jun
2002

Jul
2002

Aug
2002

Sep
2002

Oct
2002

EVERYTHING about telecommunications is about to change!

Being Wireless

by Nicholas Negroponte Micro-operators

Large wired and wireless telephone companies will be replaced by micro-operators, millions of which can be woven into a global fabric of broadband connectivity.

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Nov
2002

Kiss your chat room good-bye.

The Sims Online

by Robert Levine

The Metaverse has finally arrived: Welcome to virtual reality with a white picket fence.
A game like this has never been played — the design hinges on a full society of players. Mechanisms will kick in when you have a free-market economy.

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Dec
2002

Forget fat pipes - watch your mailbox.

The Netflix Effect

by Jeffrey M. O'Brien

While other video-on-demand companies build businesses around broadband, Netflix is taking a half-step toward the digital future with mass-produced DVDs ($1 each) and an old-fashioned delivery mechanism: the US mail.

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Jan
2003

Feb
2003

A moment of silence, please. Music was killed!

The Year the Music Dies

by Charles C. Mann Cover Magazine 11.02

Record labels are under attack from all sides - file sharers and performers, even equipment manufacturers and good old-fashioned customers - and it's killing them. To survive, the industry will need the active assistance of friends it doesn't have. The labels may be able to kill Kazaa, but they won't be able to stop even more decentralized networks like Gnutella without help from Internet service providers, cable operators, and telephone companies.

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Mar
2003

Apr
2003

May
2003

KISS YOUR NETWORK CABLE GOOD-BYE

The Wi-Fi Revolution

by Chris Anderson Sonderheft: Unwired

We stand at the brink of a transformation: Wi-Fi will drive the Internet to the next stage in its colonization of the globe. This time it is not wires but the air between them that is being transformed. Over the past three years, a wireless technology has arrived with the power to totally change the game. It's a way to give the Internet wing without licenses, permission, or even fees. In a world where we've been conditioned to wait for cell phone carriers to bring us the future, this anarchy of the airwaves is as liberating as the first PCs - a street-level uprising with the power to change everything.

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Jun
2003

Jul
2003

Forget cyberspace!

The Right Stuff

by Carl Hoffmann Cover Magazine 11.07

Geeks are about to conquer outer space. And the $10 million X Prize is just the beginning. The evolution from mainframe machines to the PC is parallel to the shift from the traditional space industry to space tourism.

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Aug
2003

The End of Cancer (As we Know it)

by Jennifer Kahn Cover Magazine 11.08

Diagnosis. Chemotherapy. Radiation. Slow painful death. No more. A new era of cancer treatment is dawning. Meet three scientists who are using the revelations of the Human Genome Project to reshape medicine.

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Sep
2003

Bye-bye silicon! Welcome diamonds!

The New Diamond Age

by Joshua Davis Cover Magazine 11.09

Put pure carbon under enough heat and pressure and it will crystallize into the hardest material known. Those were the conditions that first forged diamonds deep in Earth's mantle 3.3 billion years ago. Replicating that environment in a lab isn't easy, but that hasn't kept dreamers from trying. This summer, the first wave of gem-quality manufactured diamonds began to hit the market. Diamond has the highest thermal conductivity - tremendous heat can pass through it without causing damage. Diamond microchips could handle much higher temperatures, allowing them to run at speeds that would liquefy ordinary silicon.

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Oct
2003

Nov
2003

Kiss your pillow good-bye.

It's Wake-Up Time

by Richard Martin

A new breed of drugs promises to do for drowsiness what Prozac did for depression. Science is ready for the new generation of sleep medications.

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Dec
2003

Futurism Is Dead

by Hope Cristol

Futurism is obsolete because it now has a past: Forty years of failed predictions should be enough empirical evidence to turn even the true believer into a skeptic. Of course, if you make enough predictions, you're bound to get something right. Futurists are the first to say that futurism isn't about telling the future; it's about examining trends and fleshing out scenarios.

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Jan
2004

Feb
2004

Kiss Your Cubicle Good-Bye

The Indian Machine

by Chris Anderson Cover Magazine 12.02

Worried about India's practically infinite pool of smart, educated, English-speaking people eager to work for the equivalent of your latte budget? Get used to it. Computers threatened our jobs, but ultimately made us stronger. So will outsourcing. Today's Indian call centers, programming shops, and help desks are just the beginning. Tomorrow it will be financial analysis, research, design, graphics - potentially any job that does not require physical proximity. The American cubicle farm is the new textile mill, just another sunset industry.

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Mar
2004

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2004

May
2004

It is happening again: SO NOW KISS YOUR BROWSER GOOD-BYE FOR SURE!!!

The Return of Push

by Gary Wolf

The inspiring technology this time is RSS, a specification that allows easy syndication of news, blogs, and other frequently updated sources. Search engine results, product information, new music, notification of recent blog comments, and many other types of digital information are becoming available through RSS.

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Jun
2004

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2004

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2004

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2004

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2004

Forget the top of the charts!

The Long Tail

by Chris Anderson Long Tail Graph

The future of entertainment is in the millions of niche markets at the shallow end of the bitstream. Such is the power of the Long Tail. Its time has come.

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Nov
2004

The aristocracy of brand is dead. Long live the meritocracy of product.

The Decline of Brands

by James Surowiecki Long Tail Graph

There’s something strange going on in branding land. Even as companies have spent enormous amounts of time and energy introducing new brands, Americans have become less loyal. The truth is, we've always overestimated the power of branding while underestimating consumers' ability to recognize quality. The disappearance of loyalty means that insurance is vanishing, too - which is great for consumers. The erosion of brand value, then, means heightened competition - the more competition, the better off consumers will be.

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Dec
2004

Jan
2005

Feb
2005

Goodbye IE - you will never be opened again!

The Firefox Explosion

by Josh McHugh Cover Magazine 13.02

The hot new browser called Firefox is rocking the software world. (Watch your back, Bill Gates): It's fast, secure, open source - and super popular. If Gates & Co. continue to ignore both the pain of IE users and the lessons in Firefox's advance, they could find Internet Explorer on the scrap heap - next to Netscape.

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Mar
2005

The Book Stops Here

by Daniel H. Pink

The self-organizing, self-repairing, hyperaddictive library of the future is called Wikipedia. With software called Wiki - which allows anybody with Web access to go to a site and edit, delete, or add to what's there - Wales and his volunteer crew would construct a repository of knowledge to rival the ancient library of Alexandria.
In 2001, the idea seemed preposterous. In 2005, the nonprofit venture is the largest encyclopedia on the planet.

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Apr
2005

Discs Are So Dead

by Robert Capps

Two new formats aim to bury the DVD - but Web distribution will kill them all. Discs aren't the future of home entertainment. What is? Online distribution, bolstered by increasing bandwidth and more efficient data compression.

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May
2005

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2005

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2005

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2005

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2005

Networked TV is coming | Mobile TV will be one.

TV 2.0

by Sean Captain Cover Magazine 13.09

Internet TV circumvents traditional delivery methods - cable, satellite, broadcast - and in theory offers unlimited programming.

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Oct
2005

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2005

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2005

Jan
2006

Brain scans are reinventing the science of lie detection

Don't Even Think About Lying

by Steve Silberman

Functional magnetic resonance imaging - fMRI for short - enables researchers to create maps of the brain's networks in action as they process thoughts, sensations, memories, and motor commands. Now fMRI is also poised to transform the security industry, the judicial system, and our fundamental notions of privacy.

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Feb
2006

"Cyberspace" Is Dead

by Alex Soojung-Kim Pang and David Pescovitz

Well, the word anyway. Twenty years after William Gibson coined the term cyberspace in his novel Neuromancer, we live in a world of smart objects, always-on devices, and perpetually open information channels. The Internet feels less like an alternate world that we "go to" and more like just another layer of life. Besides, doesn't cyberspace sound kind of played out? Clearly, we need a better word. The Institute for the Future asked a virtual roundtable of leading thinkers to coin a term for our new new reality. Here's what they came up with.

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Mar
2006

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2006

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2006

Jun
2006

HDTV finally arrives...

Prime Time for Hi-Def

by Frank Rose Comparison of Hi-Def and analog TV sell

Instead of taking us back to the ’80s, the demand for HD will, if anything, propel us into the future – ABC today, YouTube tomorrow. "The faster HD happens," says Thomas Eisenmann of Harvard Business School, "the sooner we’re going to have television as we really want and deserve it": all digital, on demand, fully interactive – oh, and entirely searchable as well.

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Jul
2006

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2006

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2006

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2006

The desktop is dead. Long live the Internet Cloud!

The Information Factories

by George Gilder Pixelgraphic of Serverfarm

Welcome to the Internet cloud, where massive facilities across the globe will store all the data you'll ever use.

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Nov
2006

The iPod is the future of MP3-Players

The Perfect Thing

by Steven Levy iPod

Five years ago, Apple engineers used foam core and old fishing weights to craft a model of a new MP3 player. Everyone seemed to have a moment of enlightenment when the clouds parted and it was clear that something amazing was emerging.

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Dec
2006

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2007

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2007

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2007

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2007

Desktop, R.I.P.

by Jason Tanz Desctop is dead illustration

Computing is moving off your machine and into the cloud. Indeed, the desktop is fading. Apps once came in shrink-wrapped boxes and ran on a local operating system; today they live increasingly on the Internet, where they run in a Web browser for a monthly fee — or for no charge at all. Online video archives, encyclopedias, photo managers, calendars, even online word processors and spreadsheets are becoming ubiquitous. The desktop may vanish into the cloud, but in return the world will gain an Internet that understands individual users and how they relate to one another.

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May
2007

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2007

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2007

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2007

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2007

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2007

Forget Oil. A Plant is the Future of Energy.

One Molecule Could Cure Our Addiction to Oil

by Evan Ratliff Cover Magazine 15.10

There's just one catch: No one has yet figured out how to generate energy from plant matter at a competitive price. The result is that no car on the road today uses a drop of cellulosic ethanol.

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Nov
2007

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2007

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2008

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2008

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2008

$0.00 Is the Future of Business!

Free! Why $0.00 Is the Future of Business

by Chris Anderson Cover of Magazine 16.03

Once a marketing gimmick, free has emerged as a full-fledged economy. There's never been a more competitive market than the Internet, and every day the marginal cost of digital information comes closer to nothing.
One of the old jokes from the late-'90s bubble was that there are only two numbers on the Internet: infinity and zero. The first, at least as it applied to stock market valuations, proved false. But the second is alive and well. The Web has become the land of the free.

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Apr
2008

May
2008

Who needs apps? Give us silicon power!

Cloud Computing. Available at Amazon.com Today

by Spencer Reiss Portrait

Or less poetically, utility computing, or even the unfortunate acronym HaaS, meaning hardware as a service. Instead of building cute apps and ladling them out to the masses — the Google and Microsoft model — Amazon is delivering silicon power to the people.

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Jun
2008

Jul
2008

The End of Science

The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete

by Chris Anderson Cover Magazine 16.07

The new availability of huge amounts of data, along with the statistical tools to crunch these numbers, offers a whole new way of understanding the world. Correlation supersedes causation, and science can advance even without coherent models, unified theories, or really any mechanistic explanation at all.

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Aug
2008

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2008

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2008

Nov
2008

It's time for the next Green Revolution.

The Future of Food: How Science Will Solve the Next Global Crises.

by unknown Cover Magazine 16.11

Forty years ago, advances in fertilizers and pesticides boosted crop yield and fed a growing planet. Today, demand for food fueled by rises in worldwide consumption of meat and protein is again outpacing farmers ability to keep up.

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Dec
2008

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2009

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2009

Brothers and sisters, we are gathered here today to mourn the death of Story.

Why Hollywood Needs a New Model for Storytelling

by Scott Brown Story climax

As you may have heard, it's kaput—or, at the very least, terminally ill, wracked by videogames, wikis, recaps, talkbacks, YouTube, ADD, and the rise of a multiplatform, multipolar, mashup-media culture.

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Mar
2009

Micromanufacturing - A revolution!

The Revolution in Micromanufacturing

by Clive Thompson

Judging from the explosive growth of Etsy and other online boutiques, the Web is spawning a curious new trend: micro-manufacturing. Digital culture has always been about customization and individuality: blogging your thoughts, designing monster houses in The Sims, Flickring your life, crafting unviewable MySpace backgrounds. It's all about creating a personalized aesthetic. After years of molding the digital world to suit our style, is it any wonder we want to do the same to the physical realm?

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Apr
2009

May
2009

Jun
2009

The era of the huge conglomerate is over.

The NEW NEW ECONOMY: More Startups, Fewer Giants, Infinite Opportunity

by Chris Anderson Cover Magazine 17.06

This crisis is not just the trough of a cycle but the end of an era. We will come out not just wiser but different. The stars of finance are fleeing for smaller firms; it's the only place they can imagine getting anything interesting done.

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Jul
2009

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2009

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2009

Oct
2009

Sorry Cable, You're History!

Netflix Everywhere: Sorry Cable, You're History

by Daniel Roth Illustration

Called the Netflix Player, it would allow most of his company's regular DVD-by-mail subscribers to stream unlimited movies and TV shows from Netflix's library directly to their television—at no extra charge.

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Nov
2009

Dec
2009

The Way We Watch Movies Will Be Changed Forever!

James Cameron’s New 3-D Epic Could Change Film Forever

by Joshua Davis Portrait James Cameron

12 years after Titanic James Cameron is betting he can change forever the way you watch movies. With his vision of the next generation of cameras: maneuverable, digital, high-resolution, 3-D.

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Jan
2010

Uranium is so last century - Enter Thorium, the New Green Nuke

by Richard Martin Thorium

Get ready for thorium the supersafe, green and clean, massively abundant fuel of the future. Founded by American nuclear physicist Alvin Radkowsky — Thorium Power, since renamed Lightbridge, is attempting to commercialize technology that will replace uranium with thorium in conventional reactors. Named for the Norse god of thunder, thorium is a lustrous silvery-white metal. It’s only slightly radioactive; you could carry a lump of it in your pocket without harm.

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Feb
2010

ATOMS ARE THE NEW BITS

In the Next Industrial Revolution, Atoms Are the New Bits

by Chris Anderson Cover Magazine 18.02

The Web was just the proof of concept. Now the revolution hits the real world. Peer production, open source, crowdsourcing, user-generated content — all these digital trends have begun to play out in the world of atoms, too. In short, atoms are the new bits. It all starts with the tools. in a converted brewery in Brooklyn, Bre Pettis and his team of hardware engineers are making the first sub-$1,000 3-D printer, the open source MakerBot.

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Mar
2010

The reign of the bank and credit cartel is ending. Your wallet may never be the same!

The Future of Money: It’s Flexible, Frictionless and (Almost) Free

by Daniel Roth Cover Magazine 18.03

A new wave of financial upstarts is liberating your cash – and the economy. Cash in the clouds—neither paper nor plastic. About 20 percent of all online transactions now take place over so-called alternative payment systems, according to consulting firm Javelin Strategy and Research. It expects that number to grow to nearly 30 percent in just three years. Moving money, once a function managed only by the biggest companies in the world, is now a feature available to any code jockey.

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Apr
2010

Tablets are the future of media...

How the Tablet will change the world

by Steven Levy Cover Magazine 18.04

...if they become ubiquitous. And that will happen only if they replace laptops. The iPad is the first embodiment of an entirely new category, one that Apple CEO Steve Jobs hopes will write the obituary for the computing paradigm that Apple itself helped develop. I think most of us are willing to carry two devices (one is a phone) but not three. So why would they dump a keyboard for a touchscreen? Look to three data points for the answer: the iPhone, the Kindle, and the cloud.

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May
2010

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2010

Jul
2010

Translation Software Saves Mother Tongue

How Translation Software Saves Mother Tongue

by Clive Tompson Word Cloud of different languages

Welcome— or should I say bienvenue, maligayangpagdating, or välkomma— to a world where everyone can speak for themselves. Automatic-translation software has long been treated as a joke because of how hilariously it mangles phrases. But in the past few years, something has shifted: The technology is now surprisingly mature. Some academics predict that auto-translation could even save minor languages from extinction. In Chile, for example, pressure to speak Spanish is eroding the indigenous language of the Mapuche people. Auto-translation might make it possible for the Mapuche to communicate with the outside world without abandoning their dialect.

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Aug
2010

Flickr's concept introduces the new generation of websites!

What You Want: Flickr Creator Spins Addictive New Web Service

by Devin Leonard

There were already plenty of other photo-sharing sites, like Shutterfly and Snapfish, but Flickr was the first to incorporate the dynamics of social networks— allowing users to tag each other’s photos and follow one another. For the first time, it felt like you were using a Web site designed completely for a generation that had grown up using the Internet.

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Sep
2010

The Web is dead. Long live the Internet

by Chris Anderson, Michael Wolff Cover of Magazine 18.09

Two decades after its birth, the World Wide Web is in decline, as simpler, sleeker services — think apps — are less about the searching and more about the getting. Over the past few years, one of the most important shifts in the digital world has been the move from the wide-open Web to semiclosed platforms that use the Internet for transport but not the browser for display.

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Oct
2010

Nov
2010

Bye-bye Implants!

All Natural: Why Breasts Are the Key to the Future of Regenerative Medicine

by Sharon Begley Breasts are just the beginning

Who needs implants? How tissue engineering and a new kind of stem cell can help the body rebuild itself. Tissue engineering, a process that could well be one of the most momentous medical advances of the 21st century: the use of stem cells—specifically stem-cell-enriched adipose (fat) tissue—to enhance, heal, and rebuild injured or damaged organs.

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Dec
2010

Mark down the date: The age of stealing music is over.

The Age of Music Privacy is Officially Over

by Paul Boutin note with pirate flag

It’s time for everybody to go legit. The reason: We won. And all you audiophiles and copyfighters, you know who fixed our problems? The record labels and online stores we loved to hate. Well played, protesters: In January 2009, Apple announced that it would remove the copyright protection wrapper from every song in its store. Today, Amazon and Walmart both sell music encoded as MP3s, which don’t even have hooks for copyright-protection locks. The battle is over, comrades.

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Jan
2011

The AI Revolution Is On

by Steven Levy roboter toy

The fruits of the AI revolution are now all around us. Once researchers were freed from the burden of building a whole mind, they could construct a rich bestiary of digital fauna, which few would dispute possess something approaching intelligence.
Instead, it uses machine learning, massive data sets, sophisticated sensors, and clever algorithms to master discrete tasks. Examples can be found everywhere: The Google global machine uses AI to interpret cryptic human queries. Credit card companies use it to track fraud. Netflix uses it to recommend movies to subscribers. And the financial system uses it to handle billions of trades (with only the occasional meltdown).

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Feb
2011

Mar
2011

Apr
2011

The DIY Revolution starts now

Open Source Electronics Pioneer Limor Fried on the DIY Revolution

by Chris Anderson Do it yourself with plastic cups

People are becoming more and more comfortable with the idea of making and hacking their own stuff, even though they don’t identify as makers. In five to 10 years, I would be surprised if every public school doesn't have a required class in robotics mechatronics. You’ll have a return of wood shop, but it will be metal/robotics/electronics shop, and kids are going to have to learn sensors and technology.

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May
2011

Jun
2011

Going, Going, Gone: Who Killed the Internet Auction?

by James Surowiecki

Auctions were supposed to be the new way to buy and sell everything. It didn't turn out that way—just ask eBay - today online auctions are a niche service. What changed?
1. the advent of sniping—the practice of placing winning bids at the last second—as something that has alienated ordinary shoppers.
2. the expansion of Amazon’s Marketplace, and the ease with which Google can help you find esoteric goods all over the world, means that buyers and sellers now have many other places to do business.
3. the biggest factor in the decline of the auction may simply be that the novelty of bidding wore off.

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Jul
2011

The End of the Black Box